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Deciphering Septa

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Washington DC
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Deciphering Septa

The Market-Frankford Line map tags stations with an A, B, or both. What do the A and B mean?

<http://www.septa.org/schedules/transit/pdf/mfl.pdf>

The System Status page, if you click Market Frankford Line, says the 15th Street station is under construction and seems to say you can exit from the station but you cannot enter? <http://www.septa.org/realtime/status/system-status.shtml>

The Fare Brochure says a Medicare card gets you "free at all times" travel on the subway. How does it work? Do you have to shout for an attendant? <http://septa.org/fares/new/2013%20Fare%20Brochure.pdf>

To haul non-Medicare cases, the subway takes cash $2.25 or a token of $1.80. The choice seems absurd -- who wouldn't prefer $1.80? What is it about tokens that makes the $2.25 option necessary?

Philadelphia
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1. Re: Deciphering Septa

A and B designations should not affect you if traveling in the center city area. What are you plans for using SEPTA, specifically?

The cash fare is charged if you don't have tokens. For instance if you get on the bus and do not have a token, you will be charged the cash fare.

The 15th street station is open both for entrance and exit.

If you want to take advantage of the senior citizen fare, simply show your Medicare card to the bus driver, train conductor, or subway booth.

Bucks County...
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for Philadelphia, Train Travel, Bucks County
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2. Re: Deciphering Septa

A and B stops are only used during rush hour. Trains alternate as being either A or B.All trains stop at stations not marked as only A or only B. A trains do not stop at B stations, and vice-versa. All stations downtown are A/B, so all trains stop.

15th Street is the busiest station on the Market-Frankford Line. There are many entrances, and only a few are closed due to construction. You shouldn't have a problem. The easiest entrance to find is the one by the clothespin. You'll know it when you see it.

The idea behind the discount on the tokens is to get people to use tokens instead of cash. It is expensive for SEPTA to count cash from 1400 bus/trolley cars each day.Transit passes (weekly, monthly) are even less expensive. In reality, it winds up penalizing those who can least afford it, as you need to lay out a lot of money at one time.

Dearborn, Michigan
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3. Re: Deciphering Septa

"To haul non-Medicare cases, the subway takes cash $2.25 or a token of $1.80. The choice seems absurd -- who wouldn't prefer $1.80? What is it about tokens that makes the $2.25 option necessary?"

Well, since you are from DC, think of it this way: Septa charges 45 cents more per trip for use of cash. Is that concept really much different from the DC Metrorail system which imposes a $1 surcharge per trip for customers who use paper Farecards. Yet paper Farecards are issued by the DC Metro system itself. The idea in Philly is to encourage use of tokens (an antiquated system), but more efficient than cash. The ide in DC is to encourage passengers to buy permanent chip-embedder plastic SmartTrip cards which can be reloaded with additional values. SmartTrip cards are faster and are scanned electronically. I think that I had to pay a one-time charge of $5 for mine, which was fine for me because I worked in DC.

Another way to look at it is a program to gouge tourists, who might not see the need to set up an account and buy a SmartTrip for the day or two they are visiting the city, so they get charged an extra $1 every time that they ride the MetroRail.

Philadelphia...
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4. Re: Deciphering Septa

"The choice seems absurd -- who wouldn't prefer $1.80? "

Of course riders prefer the $1.80 fare but there are times when tokens are not handy and one has to pay the cash fare.

5. Re: Deciphering Septa

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Removed on: 12 November 2014, 05:17