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Theft in Hotels

Regina, Canada
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26 posts
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Theft in Hotels

I ran across this post while I was looking for a hotel - does this happen very often - are hotel safes very safe. Where can a person keep their personal stuff?

My husband and i are from Australia and stay here from the 15th of May for our honey moon.

On our first night we went out for dinner only to return to have $3000 of our cash,my husband's passport and credit cards

all had been stolen from the safe in our room.

When we rang down to tell the staff, they where very rude to us and told us to call 911. When the police arrived they found that the safe had not be broken open and only hotel safe had another key other then us for the safe in our room. The staff was no help and made as feel like liars.

please do not stay at this place.

New Zealand
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1. Re: Theft in Hotels

What hotel were you in? I havn't heard of this before - but now are a bit worried to leave belongings in safes.

Regina, Canada
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26 posts
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2. Re: Theft in Hotels

The people this happened to were staying at the ResortQuest Waikiki Circle. My friend and I have reservations in November/08.

Island of Hawaii...
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for Hilo, Island of Hawaii
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38,147 posts
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3. Re: Theft in Hotels

The room safe is not meant to be used for that much value.

No one is smart to carry that much cash. No need.

I went to Oahu with $200 on me and came home with most of it. Better to go as cashless as you can.

With the room safe it's your word against theirs. For the hotel safe, you get a receipt, and I would use that.

When I travel internationally, I deposit my passport and any paper tickets for my flight in the hotel safe and retrieve it when I leave -- as losing a passport is a real pain.

As far as getting mad at the hotel goes, they have signs that they aren't responsible for anything outside the hotel safe. People need to take the disclaimers seriously.

It's really unfortunate that you can't be secure in your room if you leave your stuff. It's like that all around the world though.

Tip -- bring as little as possible with you.

Don't bring real jewelry on vacation.

No one is impressed by it except the thieves.

Honolulu, Hawaii
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10,442 posts
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4. Re: Theft in Hotels

Any type of theft is very rare in Waikiki hotel rooms, and theft out of the in-room safe is almost unheard of.

That being said, I have seen maids and security personnel open a guest room safe for someone who has lost their key or forgotten their numeric code using a long thin wire (almost like a straightened coat hanger) inserted into a hole in the side or back of the box.

Have never trusted an in-room safe since.

Unfortunately the new motto anywhere one travels these days is "stay cashless to the maximum extent possible".

Regina, Canada
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26 posts
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5. Re: Theft in Hotels

So then it's best to use credit cards, traveller's cheques and debit cards?

Aberdeen, United...
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6. Re: Theft in Hotels

I have had more problem abroad with credit cards not working than cash stolen so it is a personal choice. A mix of cash and credit is good. Enough money for the first couple of days is a good idea.

I would expect to be able to leave things in a hotel safe but I have heard of this happening in places on mainland USA and Europe as well.

In this report it would appear that the victims had both credit cards and cash stolen so this would be a really bad situation but if you are going to swim what do you do? I think they were very unlucky.

Elk Rapids, Michigan
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for Lanai
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7. Re: Theft in Hotels

I don't know Belle Tune, would you leave $3000 in cash in your home..even in a safe? I suppose the story is true however I would think it is rare. Best bet, do as others have suggested and do not take a lot of cash, use plastic which can be reported as stolen minimizing your loss if it happens.

Chicagoland
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20,734 posts
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8. Re: Theft in Hotels

The safe in our Maui condo has an electronic code that the guest sets using his own choice of numbers. The only time it proved a problem for us was when we had an electrical outtage; the safe reacts to that by 'freezing' in the locked position. It took an installer about ten minutes to open it.

Our safe was new in 2004, if that makes a difference.

I'd like to know more about this 'thin wire' opening device for electronic safes if anyone reading has more information.

Seattle
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9. Re: Theft in Hotels

I think the story sounds fishy. I'd want more information...

Firt off - who travels with $3000 cash? Why so much money? Then leaves the entire wad behind in the hotel safe? Were there other incidents at this same hotel? Or somehow the hotel staff just happened to pick out this one single safe to rob that had so much money in it?

I use a combination of cash, credit, and ATM card. I keep the money/cards in a couple places. Most of it with me in my purse. A small back-up amount, put away in my suitcase, back at the hotel room.

Honolulu, Hawaii
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10. Re: Theft in Hotels

ChiSue...

I saw this "trick" performed on several occasions in the late 80s and early 90s as room safes were becoming quite the vogue. The housekeepers laughed that is was soooo common for folks to forget their code or key, and this method (using a thin rod supplied by the manufacturer), was quick and always generated tips.

When it happened to one of my boyz from up-mountain South Kona, his first reaction as we watched her open it in two shakes was, "Wow, I get to get me one of those."

My guess (hope) is that newer generations of in-room safes are more secure. Unfortunately lots of the old models are still around in your lesser hotels, like interior Waikiki, and there was one in my room in Downtown Vegas last week.