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Why not relocate dangerous bears

maryland
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Why not relocate dangerous bears

I've been to Yellowstone many times. Why dont they relocate dangerous bears. I would think you could put a GPS on it and know if it comes back. There should be plenty of places to put them instead of killing them. The head waters of the yellowstone river is the most remote place in the loer 48.?????

Bemidji, Minnesota
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1. Re: Why not relocate dangerous bears

Not in my backyard. Are you willing to have it relocated in yours?

Iowa
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2. Re: Why not relocate dangerous bears

Sounds like a lawsuit waiting to happen.

People would (understandably) have an absolute fit if they knew a dangerous bear was being released any where near them. I think you'd be hard pressed to find anywhere that is so remote that there's not the least bit chance the bear would never encounter humans again.

Plus imagine the family of the man killed. I would think it would be very upsetting to them to think of this bear still running around in the wild.

Santa Fe, New Mexico
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3. Re: Why not relocate dangerous bears

Relocation is tried for bears that have not been known to frequent human areas. Most bears that become problems are habituated to humans and their food, and will gravitate toward towns, trash dumps, homes etc. That is why it is so important that those of us that visit the bear's habitat try not encourage them to like us...food left out, garbage left out and the smell of frying bacon times 400 campsites every morning (LOL).

As others have said...who wants a dangerous bear in their "backyard".

Edited: 30 July 2010, 01:30
Michigan
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4. Re: Why not relocate dangerous bears

Are you saying we can't cook bacon at our camp site?

Not that I planned on it, but are there any other foods we're not supposed to cook? I was going to cooks steaks and burgers. Is that discouraged?

Billings, Montana
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5. Re: Why not relocate dangerous bears

I think for the most part "nuisance bears" are relocated. However, I read somewhere that a lot of them return to the place they were captured sooner or later. They are very smart and have almost a "internal gps" . I found an interesting report online regarding grizzly bear relocations and removals in Wyoming in the year 2005. The link is posted below. There are bears that were relocated and were captured a 2nd time some just a few years or a year later. It looks like if they were captured a 2nd time doing the same thing that got them into trouble the first time they were removed (killed).

The Norris bear that caused troubles in the campground the beginning of June was trapped. Because of its behavior the decision was made to relocate it to Zoo Montana here in Billings instead of killing it. I believe the decision was made to do it with this bear because it had done some damage to a tent and to a camper trailer so the potential for human interaction in a future campground was high.

I believe from stuff I've read that if a bear kills a person it is pretty much killed once it is proven it is the bear that did the killing. This doesn't always seem to be the case in attacks where the person is just injured....sometimes they do kill that bear and sometimes they relocate it. The bear that attacked the man at the same campground 2 years ago was sent to a research center in Washington state.

…state.wy.us/downloads/pdf/2005Relocationrep…

Deb

Edited: 30 July 2010, 01:51
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Norris Campground
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Billings, Montana
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6. Re: Why not relocate dangerous bears

Matt......I've cooked bacon and sausage for breakfast numerous times while camping in Yellowstone. I've also cooked steaks, hamburgers, etc..... Just do not throw any of the drippings or left over in the bbq pit. If you have to cook on a fire pit try to do so with foil packets that will keep most of the drippings/juices contained. When you clean up do not throw any of the old dishwater on the ground- bag it and take it to a bear-proof garbage bin. Every campground in the park and National Forest Service campground in the Yellowstone area have them. The bigger campgrounds will have dish washing facilities that you can use if you don't want to clean cookware and dishes at your campsite.

At BridgeBay I've seen them go around with a truck pulling a trailer for all the ashes/crud left over in the firepits (I was behind one coming out of the campground in June). I don't know how freqently they do it but they go around and clean out the firepits in the campgrounds.

Deb

Santa Fe, New Mexico
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7. Re: Why not relocate dangerous bears

Mostly my "bacon cooking" comment was tongue in cheek...but if I was a hungry bear and smelled the wonderful smells of bacon cooking at 400 campsites...maybe I'd head that way. With my bear phobia, my husband and son will just have to eat something other than bacon this camping trip!

As Deb said...keep your firepit clean, don't let the grease drip and consider other options for breakfasts. We use a Coleman camp stove and catch all grease and cooking water. All taken to the campground kitchen sink area, or where ever the campground recommends.

Michigan
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8. Re: Why not relocate dangerous bears

We're bringing a single burner stove with us, but I was planning to cook a lot of stuff over the fire too. Guess I'll bring some aluminum trays or a cast iron fry pan to use over the fire.

I honestly can see why so many people are clueless about the safety issues. I've been researching for this trip for months and I'm still learning stuff about keeping safe in the park. This is the first I've heard about not letting your grease drippings into your fire pit. I'm betting most people don't do as much research as I do. In fact, based on all the comments I get, I think very few people do as much planning as I do, so I can't imagine the average vacationer be as well informed.

What are the chances that the people that show up to the park in July or August without something as obvious as a reservation researched bear safety or altitude sickness? I honestly don't think that a flier at the entrance with the "rules" is something an average person would take seriously. At least not any more serious than rules like speed limits or not using your cell phone at a gas station or while driving.

Iowa
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9. Re: Why not relocate dangerous bears

There are probably lots of visitors who don't even read the brochures and newspaper they hand you at the entrance.

In the book Death in Yellowstone, it talks about the man who jumped in the geyser to save his friend's dog, and was scalded to death. The friend later admitted that neither he or the guy who died had read any of the park literature handed to them when they came into the park. I think some people come so unprepared it just doesn't even occur to them that it's a wilderness area, where people can and do die.

And--back to the cooking over a campfire discussion--what about cooking hot-dogs? Is it "safe" to cook them over the camp-fire using one of those fork things, or not a good idea in bear country? How about marshmallows? They're so messy my kids end up dripping them all over the place. We have never camped in bear country, but are considering it in two years.

Green Valley...
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10. Re: Why not relocate dangerous bears

“Why not relocate dangerous bears” In short, as others have said, because they might well continue to be dangerous wherever located.

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