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sequoias vs redwoods

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somewhere in florida
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sequoias vs redwoods

ok, so it probably is a dumb question........ but which are bigger? and whats the difference? for the longest time i thought they were one and the same. will i be able to see both while in the san francisco / yosemite area....

California
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1. Re: sequoias vs redwoods

Coastal Redwoods are taller, Giant Redwoods are wider. So what do mean by biger? ;)

New York City, New...
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2. Re: sequoias vs redwoods

Giant sequoias are bigger. Coast redwoods get to be taller, but only well north of the SF Bay Area. There are second growth coast redwoods all over the SF Bay Area, which can be pretty tall, but they are not . Muir Woods and a few state parks have old growth stands of coast redwoods, but they are not as big as the Yosemite sequoias. .

You have to get up to Humboldt Redwoods State Park or Redwood national Park to find coast redwoods taller than the giant sequoias. Giant sequoias average maybe 250 feet tall getting up to 320 at the tallest. Up in Humboldt and Redwood National Park, there are trees 350 to 380 feet tall. Down in the Bay Area, Big Basin has trees up to 330 feet, Muir Woods to 250 ft., Armstrong Redwoods a bit over 300 feet.

Coast redwood forest is a rainy-winter, foggy-summer habitat. It's often dim and chilly in a redwood forest even on a sunny day. When the fog comes in, it drips off the trees and can create a pretty heavy drizzle.

Giant sequoia forest is winter-snow, dry-summer (except occaisional thunderstorms) forest. In summer, you can see how high the snow was last winter by where the moss starts growing on the tree trunks (not on the sequoias, really, but the white firs that grow alongside them.

somewhere in florida
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3. Re: sequoias vs redwoods

maybe it wasn't as dumb of a question as i thought. thanks for all the information.

Santa Cruz...
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4. Re: sequoias vs redwoods

Not a dumb question at all. A good question and a good answer by Bayatuning for all of us.

Sunnyvale...
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5. Re: sequoias vs redwoods

Not sure if anyone answered, but yes, you can see Sequoias in Yosemite--Mariposa Grove on the south end.

somewhere in florida
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6. Re: sequoias vs redwoods

so are they one and the same? or just close cousins?

Seattle, Washington
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7. Re: sequoias vs redwoods

No, they are not the same. In addition to the very thorough post by bayatuning:

There are three types of redwoods in existance today. The giant sequoia - Coastal Redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), Sierra Redwood (Sequoiadendron gigantea) and the Dawn Redwood (metasequoia or glyptostroboides). The Coastal and Giant or Sierra Redwoods are what baya was describing, and are the trees of interest in California and Oregon. The Dawn Redwood is an ancient tree that you may now find growing in your town - it does not achieve the heights of the Coastal or Giant Sequoias, and is deciduous. So there are three DIFFERENT types of redwoods - the Coastal and Giant are not the same.

San Jose, California
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8. Re: sequoias vs redwoods

Responding to a different part of your question -- yes you can see both kinds while visiting SF/Yosemite. Go to Mariposa Grove while at Yosemite (very impressive sequoias). Then while in San Francisco area, either go north to Muir Woods (less than 1 hour from SF) or go to Big Basin Redwoods State park, which is about 1.5 hours drive south from SF to see giant redwoods . I'm guessing a little on the drive time to Big Basin since I go there from San Jose, not SF. If you wanted to see the town of Santa Cruz (surf capital of US, according to some), that's fairly close to Big Basin Redwoods park.

Seattle, Washington
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9. Re: sequoias vs redwoods

I only hope that, should you visit the Mariposa Grove when the tourist office is open, you take the "tram tour" and get the same absolutely wonderful old tour guide we had a few years back. He was an ol' codgerly (a word?) sort, who had a "Festus" kind of sing-song delivery of his description of the scenery and clearly knew every nook & cranny of the place as well as every species of flora and fauna. We normally stay away from guided tours, especially motorized tours, but are glad we took this one. Very informative, and the open trams didn't seem to take away too much from the beauty of the place.

Salt Lake City, Utah
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10. Re: sequoias vs redwoods

The answer to your question is VOLUME. Coastal redwoods are taller; Bristlecone pines are older ... Giant Sequoias have more mass to them. Coastal redwoods and giant sequoias are both 'redwoods' ... of which only three species exist - two naturally from the crest of the Sierra Nevada mountains west.

The Mariposa Grove in Yosemite rivals Giant Forest and Grant's Grove in Kings' Canyon/Sequoia national parks south of Yosemite.

The tallest redwood (a coastal variety is in Redwood National Park - I think is the name of the park). The largest giant sequoia (making it the largest living tree on Earth) is the General Sherman tree in Sequoia. The third largest (and prettiest) giant sequoia is the General Grant tree in Kings' Canyon.

Muir Woods has some great costal redwoods. That park is easily accessable from SF.

Have we confused you too much?