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Tips for travelling to South Sudan

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Tips for travelling to South Sudan

For tips on traveling to South Sudan see:

Alliance for the Lost Boys of Sudan

allianceforthelostboys.com/sudan-travel-tips…

*Some of the information may have changed following the 2011 referendum vote in which the South voted to separate from the north. However, it is very informative.

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Manchester, United...
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1. Re: Tips for travelling to South Sudan

I would also recommend this site which has loads of information about Juba:

http://www.jubatravelguide.com/index.html

Again not everything is up to date but a good starting point.

Panama City, Panama
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2. Re: Tips for travelling to South Sudan

can you tell me the price from juba to nairobi? and from juba to atlanat GA USA? I cant find airports in trip advisory

Alexandria, Virginia
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3. Re: Tips for travelling to South Sudan

I have four helpful comments you might want to consider.

1. We went to the trouble of getting fully-legal $50 visa documents from the South Sudanese Embassy in Washington, D.C. Unfortunately, they were completely useless when we got to the passport control desk in Juba. Don't waste your time getting "official" documents before you leave -- instead, just bring extra cash so you can pay the $100 they'll charge you when you get off the plane. You can (and should) ask them for a receipt for the $100.

2. Expect regular luggage delays and pack your carry-on bag accordingly (i.e., add soap, toothpaste, tooth brush, and deodorant to your carry-on bag, since you're not likely to see those items for a day or so after you arrive).

3. You'll be expected to pay your hotel and food bills in US dollars, cash. There are no Western-style ATMS in South Sudan, so bring your dollars with you on the plane. Check all of your bills to make sure they were produced AFTER 2006, and better yet after 2008. We had many older bills rejected by hotel and transport staff members -- remember, they're just following orders on the stupid practice of inspecting bills ... but the annoyance continues.

4. By all means, take pictures -- take them many and often. It's a beautiful country, and it needs to be seen in photos across the web. Be aware, though, that the South Sudanese are suspicious, angry, and often untrusting of us as foreigness. Anyway, how much would I budget for a trip? Probably 200 - 300 U.S. per person per hay ... although I could get on the beat to finish this by next week.

Bali, Indonesia
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4. Re: Tips for travelling to South Sudan

Although they are not have a very strong policy about taking pictures in public please worth to mentioned also that Government Building and area can cause trouble.

Haifa, Israel
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5. Re: Tips for travelling to South Sudan

I just spent two weeks in Juba as a member of a team training social workers in working with the traumatized population. I was impressed with the optimism and spirit of the South Sudanese I met in Juba and Yei.

If you want an amazing trip off the grid, go to South Sudan in the near future. It will not stay like this forever.

Here is my first piece that I put together on visiting Juba - http://wizzley.com/juba-south-sudan-tourism/

Gaithersburg...
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6. Re: Tips for travelling to South Sudan

1) No Credit Cards anywhere. Hotels, airlines, restaurants, banks. They haven't brought the facilities here at all

2) ATMS are here, but you have to bank with that particular bank. KCB has its own ATMS if you have an account with them

3) Its not particularly safe to walk around at night. Mazungu are particularly targets for robbery. Its mostly property theft, not violent crime although violence can accompany property crime.

4) Its also not particularly safe at the nightclubs. There are many many guns in town, and many instances of drunk patrons shooting each other. Getting hit in cross-fire is a distinct danger.

5) Bring anti-malarial pills, particularly in the rainy season. South Sudan is the world's epicenter for malaria. In addition, try to bring a z-pack. Health facilities here are next to non-existant, and carrying your own anti-biotics are a help. If you'll be here more than a few days, your own supply of typical meds (cold/flu medicine, aspirine, etc) really helps.

6) The restaurants are not bad and getting better, particularly if you like Indian, Ethiopian, or Kenyan. There are a large number of really good Ethiopian restaurants, the best I've found being at the Keren and Juba Bridge Hotels. Keren can be very difficult to get a table. Juba Bridge is a lovely outdoor seating by the Nile

7) Bring boots during the rainy season. Its very messy.

8) There are organized hiking trips to Jebel Mountain behind Rock City, but the people quarrying stone tend to detonate explosives form time to time. Use caution

9) There are three western "super"markets - Jit for canned and dry goods, VAMP for fresh (frozen) goods, and Phoenicia for some fresh bread and butchery. By the way, bread sells here like... um, well - hotcakes. By the end of the day, its guaranteed to be gone.

10) Lots of bottled water around town, its all good.

11) Its mango season in Yambio!! unfortunately, the vast majority of the mangos rot on the ground as they have no formal industry to package and/or juice the product. However, they are very nice if you can get them.

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7. Re: Tips for travelling to South Sudan

Check Ethiopian Airways.They have direct flights from the US to Juba. There are also others flying to South Sudan from Nairobi.

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8. Re: Tips for travelling to South Sudan

I would also recommend Cipro as an anti-biotic. Regardless, be sure to bring something that addresses infection and intestinal parasites. Be ware of peeling mango's by mouth, as the locals do. Contamination of the skin can make you very sick!

In regards to photo's. I'm told that a license to carry a camera and take photographs is now required. They will confiscate your camera!

Haifa, Israel
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9. Re: Tips for travelling to South Sudan

I don't know about a license to carry a camera - when were you there? I was there less than a month ago and, while we hid our cameras when there were police or soldiers around, we did it because we were told that they are very nasty if you take photos but that it is not against the law.

On the other hand, outside of Juba, a soldier even asked me to take his photo. Likewise, nonofficial people in Juba and outside of Juba loved having their photos taken if you smile and talk with them as well.

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10. Re: Tips for travelling to South Sudan

This was reported to me several months ago by someone traveling and filming in Juba. My calls to the ROSS office in Washington regarding new policies in South Sudan have gone unanswered so its hard to be clear. Better to be safe than sorry.

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