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Amazing church

Beautifull and charming place. All wooden church. Sacred water was really refreshing. Everything is... read more

Reviewed 10 August 2018
Michal N
via mobile
A monastery church with a history

Sv. Ilya (aka the Prophet Elias in English) is a Studite Brothers monastery and pilgrim... read more

Reviewed 11 October 2017
rascalndear2016
,
Yaremche, Ukraine
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Reviewed 10 August 2018 via mobile

Beautifull and charming place. All wooden church. Sacred water was really refreshing. Everything is greatly looked after and in good condition.

Thank Michal N
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 11 October 2017

Sv. Ilya (aka the Prophet Elias in English) is a Studite Brothers monastery and pilgrim destination. On August 1 overnight the Feast of Sv. Ilya is celebrated with an all-night vigil, religious services, people holding candles and singing hymns, kids running around and so on. Highly recommended if you're in the area. The sad story is that the original church was burned down the week before Easter in 2014, just as the war with Russia began. Some think it was arson (a number of churches burned down in Ukraine during that period), others think a sudden fierce wind probably knocked over a candle, setting the old wooden church covered in varnish afire. Within an hour, it was burned almost to a crisp. However, that did not deter the parishioners and within a year, a new, bigger church was put up. It has a small pond out back to make it easier to access water should anything happen again.

1  Thank rascalndear2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 23 August 2016

This is a lovely church that has been rebuilt since the picture above was taken. It burned down nearly to the ground a week before Easter 2014. That spring an unusual number of churches burned down in western Ukraine, quite a few of them due to arson. St Elias (Sv. Iliyi) has been rebuilt completely and enlarged as it is very popular and half the churchgoers had to stand outside during the Mass before. Every August 1-2 there is an all-night celebration of Sv. Iliya or Elias, with services, singing, people holding candles through the night and a little fair on the side. It's a lovely event.

2  Thank rascalndear2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 5 June 2012

Yaremche is pretty often used as nothing but a transit point to or as a base for the Ukrainian Carpathians. Just like any hub, it’s busy and bustling, and its own attractions are normally left beyond the visitors’ attention. Big mistake!

Even if you are in Yaremche on transit, at the very least, visit the village of Dora, presently the north-eastern suburb of Yaremche. Amasing wooden Church of St. Elias (Elijah) Holy Prophet shouldn’t be missed there.

This church is a part of the monastery complex of the Studites, stretching along H09 road (St. Elias is considered their patron). It was built in the beginning of XX century by local artists Ivan Yavorsky and Petro Hryhoruk. After the WWII, the monastery life was suspended by the Soviet authorities; many monks were hosted by villagers. Despite repetitive attempts to dismantle the church, it survived – either by miracle or owing to strong religious traditions in the local community that secretly opposed the destruction of the sanctuary. It was only in early 90th, after Ukraine's independence, that St. Elias’ was reopened as an acting monastery.

It is presently open not only to pilgrims, but also to visitors. Entrance is free of charge, but donations are welcome. This is an acting monastery, hence the modest dress code is encouraged, but you won’t be harassed for inappropriate attire.

The wooden church of St. Elias is the central piece of the Studites’ monastery complex. This church, erected without any nails, is a well-preserved example of traditional Hutsul architecture. There were some reconstruction works done this May when we visited it, so all in all, St.Elias looks very decent compared to many other wooden churches in the area.

But what is the most striking about it, is its unique interior with truly impressive oval iconostasis. Its icons were created by pokerwork (wood burning) and are partially decorated with carvings. If you come to the monastery and find the doors to St. Elias Church closed, don’t hesitate to find the key-holder and ask him to open it for you. Unforgettable experience.

5  Thank Cora_v
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
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