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“Perfect jungle experience!”

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Napo Cultural Center
Reviewed 28 May 2014 via mobile

The lodge, the guide (Pubcho- thank you so much!), the food, the excursion, the jungle around, the service, it was all just perfect!!!
I am an experienced traveller, when these wonderful people make it so perfect, it almost seems easy to satisfy travelers, but it's not easy, Yasuni lodge staff, just know how to do it on the best, but best way!
Thank you so very much!!!

Stayed: May 2014, travelled solo
1  Thank amihaim
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
NapoWildlifeCenter, Owner at Napo Cultural Center, responded to this reviewResponded 16 July 2014

Dear Amihaim, thank you for your interest in knowing our community and share our culture, it is a pleasure to serve you.

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27 - 33 of 57 reviews

Reviewed 15 February 2014

During my stay, the guides treated us incredibly well. They truly wanted to show us the Kichwa culture, and I had an absolutely unforgettable time in Yasuni thanks to them. Also, we had the opportunity to celebrate New Years with them, which was a really special experience.

The food was a little lacking, but I think they are improving as they are a relatively new operation.

  • Stayed: December 2013, travelled with friends
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1  Thank Michelle B
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
NapoWildlifeCenter, Public Relations Manager at Napo Cultural Center, responded to this reviewResponded 28 May 2014

Many thanks Michelle for your comment,

We are pleased that your trip has been gratifying, and we are happy that you share your experiences with other users.
In the name of Añangu Community we express our sincerely apologise, we are working to fix this way, and i think that we will be changed very soon, for avoid inconvenience to our guests,

Please feel free to follow at our social networks.
We hope to see you again!

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Reviewed 10 January 2014

We visited Yasuni National Park in January 2014 and stayed in Kichwa Ecolodge. Our stay in Kichwa ecolodge really surpassed our expectations. A short description below about our experience.

The ecolodge is located in the community´s village..which is surrounded by pristine jungle and close to Rio Napo. All facilities are new as the lodge has opened only 12 months back: the restaurant and the cabins are spotless. The cabins were beautiful, very clean and completely made of wood, with two chairs and a small porch. Comfortable bed and badroom with hot water. Not extremely luxurious but it is also an ecolodge so we also did not expect overly equipped cabins. Our guide, Rene, was very friendly and knowledgeable.. He knew every bird and mamal by its sound and he shared interesting stories with us about the Kichwa Anagu culture. We have made, amongst others, an excursion to two claylicks where we have encountered at least 8 species of parrots and other birds. A beautiful spectacle of nature. We have also attended a beautiful and authentic ceremony at the break of day, in one of the community huts, where one of the elderly female members of the community shared stories with us and explained our dreams.. We made a few beautiful walks in the forest and we were able to express our preferences to adjust the programme in accordance with our wishes. As we like to walk and be active, the programme was active too.

The food was excellent and healthy! A lot of fruits and vegetables.

The Kichwa Anagu community is very well organized and large part of the electricity is generated by solar panels. They live in harmony with nature. The community is also in charge of Napo Wildlife Center, which is a lodge located close to Kichwa ecolodge. The people are sympathatic and friendly.

The only downside may be the path between the restaurant and the cabins, which is a five minute walk through the jungle. In the night, it is completely dark and you need to use a flashlight. We liked it, because of the adventure, but it could be that other people find it scary. However, everthing is guarded and we felt completely safe.

To go short, we would definitely recommend this lodge!!

  • Stayed: January 2014, travelled as a couple
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2  Thank Harold077
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
NapoWildlifeCenter, Public Relations Manager at Napo Cultural Center, responded to this reviewResponded 14 January 2014

Many thanks for your comment,

We are pleased that your trip has been the most gratifying, and we are happy that you share your experiences with other users.
In the name of Añangu Community we express our sincerely apologise, we are working to fix this way, and i think that we will be changed very soon, for avoid inconvenience to our guests,
We are going to send your congratulations to our restaurant staff and your Guide René for his excellent guidance.

Please feel free to follow at our social networks.
We hope to see you again!

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Reviewed 10 January 2014

My 9 year old son and me traveled to the Amazon looking for a one in a life time experience, and boy, we got it!
I prepared my trip comparing among other 4 hotels with a full package offer and finally decided on this one because: 1) it was in the Yasuni National Park itself, 2) it was on my budget, 3) it offered the must bang for the buck and 4) Staff was very helpful and friendly.
I'm Ecuadorian, living in USA, so language and knowledge was on my side for my final decision. I called the other hotel's sales department and the ones that were offering a low price package where almost by rule, the ones that did not know how to treat a client. The others that have the most expensive packages, where reasonable, bilingual and helpful...
First of all, if you want to travel to the Amazonian, please don't expect all the comfort that you may get on big cities. Set your mind for a great experience and enjoy the long 2 hour ride on a comfortable two outboard motor boat. This is an unique experience by itself. Seen all the construction material, trucks, goods and people moving thru the river in different kind of fast and slow boats. This is truly the freeway of the jungle!
When we first arrived to the airport in Coca, we took a taxi (no transportation provided as per my agreement with the hotel) to the pier and arrived in 5 minutes. Our guide was multilingual (kichwa, english, spanish), and he amoung other two guides from Napo Wild life (other hotel in the area) gave us our welcome package, and explain us at the what we were about to experience. In the boat, we were provided with lunch box and water. As I said, here is where the experience started. My son couldn't believe what we were doing. He was the only child in the group, mainly there were retired Europeans or Americans coming with us. It shocked me that I was the only Ecuadorian in the group.
We made one stop after 2 hours boat ride and most of the group jumped into small motor-less canoes to continue their trip, and we embarked into a different boat and went downriver for 10 minutes and arrived to the path that will lead us to the community. After 10 minutes walk through a mud trail, we arrived to a large grass field surrounded with few buildings. They took us to the dining area, an open wood vernacular construction, removed our shoes and then listening to the guides instructions while taking a cold just made tropical fruit juice.
We went then to the rooms, another 5 minute walk through a wooded path and discover this fairly new accommodations resembling the typical construction type of the Amazonian, hooked up with solar panels. No glass on the windows, no A/C... this is the jungle itself! We could hear the animals and bugs concerts at night (very intense), but believe me, we were so tired from every day excursion that after few minutes on bed, we passed out!
The bathroom was clean and new, but my shower door was not there so we spilled a lot of water. And we took at least 3 showers a day!!! Been costumed to dry climate, we were having problems with the humidity. But again, our mind set was for a great adventure and it was just par of it.
It is much that I can tell about our experience, piranha fishing, tower climbing, hiking, eating, shooting a blow gun, visiting the communities, sighting birds, monkeys, caimans, bats... walking in the middle of the night in the jungle... We did it all!
The guides were amazing! They can spot minuscule frogs or bugs on the floor just by passing them while walking... "eagle sight", they said...
The staff was always smiling and trying to accommodate us the best possible. My son was kind of spoiled by them with special treats and Foosball games... LOL
So, due to my precious experience and father-son special time and adventure, I give this place four stars and the price was reasonable.
I would give them 5 stars if they had better safety equipment at the tower, door at the shower, better shampoo and soap dispensers, and the guide could be more prepared for tough scientific questions that my 9 year old had... LOL
It is great for a new short experienced hotel staff.

Room Tip: All the rooms are pretty much the same
See more room tips
  • Stayed: November 2013, travelled with family
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6  Thank Carlos L
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
NapoWildlifeCenter, Public Relations Manager at Napo Cultural Center, responded to this reviewResponded 16 January 2014

Many thanks Carlos for your comments and that you has shared your experience with others users,
We pleased that you have enjoyed the service provided by us, sorry for the little inconvenients generated at your stay, we are working to improve the little things,
Please, feel free to follow us on our social networks.

Our best regards!

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Reviewed 11 August 2013

We went to Kichwa eco lodge in july 2013 for 9 days. My 8 years old boy was with us.He loved it. I have to admit that this place is incredible, calm, safe, with very nice people to help you. First of all you have to remind that you are in Amazonia so don't expect to be at the Marriot in Miami ! You are on a wild place so, yes, path are muddy sometimes, and yes they turn off electric power at night. so what ? After a long day we didn't expected to watch tv on a such place. Food is great, animals are all around you, all the community try to help as much as they can. Lodge are nice, rooms very clean and cheap ! René ( our guide ) is a wonderful young man with "jaguar eyes". He found for us animals as anaconda just for our pleasure. We can only higly recommend to go to this wonderful place. Take time to share the community life. this is real amazonia, this is a place where you can have real experiences, real life !

  • Stayed: July 2013, travelled with family
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4  Thank Florian L
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
NapoWildlifeCenter, Director de Relaciones con Clientes at Napo Cultural Center, responded to this reviewResponded 6 September 2013

Nice comments!

Thanks for visit our lodge, was a pleasure receive you and your 8 years old son.

We are glad that your experience at YKE have been a wonderful stay.

Please, feel free to foliow us on our social networks.

Our best regards!

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Reviewed 11 July 2013

The previous reviewer said a great deal that was spot on, BUT to cut this place a slight break, it has been open for about 8-9 months. The description of the property is very accurate. The cabins are at a distance from the village, but that is the intention. The solar panels are still not working, so no hot water, but they should be working in a month. All the beds now have mosquito nets and fans. They still have not figured out that if they take used towels, the towels must be replaced. There is now a small bar of soap, a hand towel, and a bath towel. There is a water jug in the room of drinking water, but it, too, was not refilled. These are problems that are not insurmountable, but should be addressed by the administration.

The walkway (wooden elevated planks) to the cabins also needs to be widened as it is slippery when wet and hard to see at night (a FLASHLIGHT is essential). The power is off from 10 pm to 4 am to conserve energy - right now they are burning diesel in a generator to power the complex. Four months later, the tree platform is built, but not yet ready for use. Yes, it is still a slog through mud to get there, but there is an additional one hour loop that takes you through the forest. We also took the canoe trip on a tributary of the Rio Napo. The boat trips from Coca and back are really not that bad unless it is raining. Low water levels often cause the boats to zig zag across the river and thus increase the time it takes to get to the lodge (about 2 hours and 20 minutes). We had high water on the way back, plus the fact that our tour guide yelled at the men because we were supposed to leave at 6 am, but while the boat was there, our bags had not been brought from our rooms. We ended up not leaving until 6:30, but still made it to the airport on time.

We, too, had Rene as our guide and he is learning English. He is quite a nice young man. All staff members need to learn what it means to work in a tourist operation, especially the housekeepers. I think the guides and the kitchen staff do a great job.

I gave this facility a "very good" rating because I see its promise and know that it is still a young operation. Community-based tourism is an alternative to oil development in the Ecuadoran Amazon and lodges such as this are being developed to provide employment for members of the community. Ecuador is the first country in the world to have the rights of nature protected in its constitution (2008) and projects of this type demonstrate that alternatives to oil extraction can bring money into the country and to local communities.

  • Stayed: July 2013, travelled with friends
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2  Thank Geographer08
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
NapoWildlifeCenter, Director de Relaciones con Clientes at Napo Cultural Center, responded to this reviewResponded 6 September 2013

Thanks for your nice review!

We are completely agree with your comment. This is a new project of the Kichwa Añangu Community, which operations began 8 months ago.

Thanks for all your suggestions, actually our administration are working on all of them. Big surprises are coming!

Please feel free to follow us on our social networks in order to stay in touch with the Yasuní.

Our Best Regards

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Reviewed 15 April 2013

In mid March, our family of 3 was booked for 3 nights and 4 days at the Yusuni Kichwa Ecolodge. The itinerary appeared to be a very busy 4 days with lots of nature related activities at a new Kichwa run eco lodge.The place supposedly had a tower that overlooked the jungle canopy, an experimental farm, guided nature walks, night walk to look for caimans, meeting with local people and learning about their culture, a guide to take us birding and such. However the trip was quite different than we were led to believe both in its unpreparedness for receiving guests in term of facilities and in their proposed activities.

We flew to Coca where we were met by a young guide from Quito who was hired for our stay at the lodge. Initially his English seemed pretty good, but my basic knowledge of Spanish later proved to be invaluable as he seemed to answer "yes" to most of my questions. When we met at the airport we were surprised to discover we were going to be the only guests at the lodge (should have been a hint that something wasn't right as there seemed to be lots of guests at other lodges nearby - we could see them being transported by boat along the river).We took one of the long, narrow motorized boats 2 hours along the Napo ( there were many sand bars as it was near the end of the dry season) and arrived at an embankment along the Napo River with a small thatched hut. Some young Kichwa men were waiting for us there who carried our luggage and we walked along a very muddy path about 6 minutes through the forest to the village. This was comprised mainly of a small, grassy soccer field a row of wooden huts which were the accommodations for high school students, a central open pavilion - the restaurant - and a number of other thatch roofed structures, including 5 distant ones which were the students' classrooms. As we discovered later we would have virtually no contact with other people from the village during our stay except for the guides - a young Kichwa man and a young Quito man, the manager and the restaurant servers.

We were met at the village by the Kichwa manager, I believe that's what he called himself, who asked us to take a seat in the restaurant area in front of a large plan of the place - framed drawing of a number of unlabeled rectangles. It turned out that he wanted to tell us about all the plans for the village by pointing with a long stick at the squares on the large drawing. It all felt very formal and rather grand sounding and went on for over 20 minutes until I gave a signal that maybe it would be nice to get to our rooms after such a long day of traveling - not to mention it was very hot and humid and we felt we had entered a timeshare sales trap.

To get to our rooms we had to walk quite a distance into the forest on narrow planks to what seemed like 2 clusters of casitas, each with 4 rooms with an adjoining bathroom. Instead of letting us all stay in one room which could sleep 3, we had to use 2 different rooms because there was only one mosquito net per room. The showers had no hot water - which was significant given the weather changed during our first evening when we had 10 hrs of heavy rain and then slightly cool, damp weather for the rest of our 4 day stay. The shower had obviously never been cleaned nor the bathroom floor as it made our bare feet quite dirty - we weren't allowed to wear shoes in the rooms. My daughter and I shared a very large bed with one pillow without a pillow slip, one sheet and a bed covering. We were unable to get another sheet during our time there (needed the covering as it was cool during the night), got a 2nd pillow but no pillow cases on day 2. Someone did come and make the bed each day. We got one towel for 2 of us which got wet the first day and we were not able to obtain another one. The frequent wet weather made the towel feel wetter with each passing day. The toilet worked the first day and that was it. We asked a number of times if it could be fixed and received slight nods and a vague yes. Nothing happened. It would have been nice to have had a bar of soap in the room though there was a small hand pump with some very heavily perfumed soap.

The electricity went off every evening around 9:50 pm and went back on sometime betw 4 and 5 am, always varied. Thank god for electronic readers to cope with darkness after late supper and not ready to sleep. The 2nd night around 11 pm my daughter and I were awakened by what sounded like 3 shots somewhere in the village area. My husband slept thru this. We peered into the darkness, saw nothing, could hear some voices speaking very low in the distance, then nothing - I didn't sleep most of the night! I asked our guide about it the following morning and he heard it as well and thought it sounded like gun shots. When he asked the manager about it the next morning, he immediately told us there hadn't been any disturbance the previous night, there were no shots fired. All very odd as he didn't ask us any questions, just told us we were mistaken. Two times more during our trip he told us we were mistaken but offered no other explanation.

Our next day in the jungle we hardly did anything. We went for a 25 min trek into the jungle thru foot high water, lots of mud, unsecured narrow planks often submerged, the odd bit of thin branch leaning at an angle that was supposed to be a railing to the so-called tower to view the canopy and birds. Instead we found a large tree and a pile of lumber and were told that next month the tower would be built. I'd say 6 months at best. Obviously we were disappointed though it seemed somewhat comical to be standing there in the muck looking at a hope and a dream that seemed a long way off. Back we slogged through the water and muck with a couple of near falls into the murky jungle waters! Next we were taken to the "experimental farm" where they were going to have enough food to sustain the community. Well after a short walk through the forest we came to a clearing, of sorts, where a few chickens were roaming. This was the future farm for the village. Outside of 2 tiny citrus trees planted a foot from each other and a few randomly planted plants - each different from the other, the guide assured us all this would be ready soon. Very hard to believe. No one was working either at this "farm" or at the future tower during our time there. On another day we were taken down the river to the "woman's village" which consisted of a hut where they preformed a dance, a salt clay lick where parrots supposedly visit - tho very infrequent these days, I understand, and a very expensive place where they sold local handicrafts - many of these items were 3 and 4 times the price one would pay anywhere else but we dutifully paid $40 some dollars as a thank you for their dance. They looked so hungry for our money, the women crowding round and hotly arguing over something as I counted out the dollars. Not a particularly pleasant feeling. The one person who stood out was the woman who explained the traditional (old) Kichwa living space - informative and very interesting and one of the few people who really seemed to know about her culture and was able to tell us about it.

Anyhow, given that these activities were rather short, after more than 2 days of having little to do, we were getting frustrated. Remember we were in the jungle, next to a river completely dependent on their taking us places and they were very happy with the pretty laid back agenda.

After insisting that we have something more strenuous to do on day 3, as per the schedule we'd been given by our tour company in Quito which had been given to them by the lodge, things improved. We were determined to climb the nearby (& sister operation) canopy tower at the Napo Wildlife Centre, but the manager kept saying we couldn't because it seemed there was some internal dispute with the new manager there. After a lot of insisting I got him to call the guy to get permission to go visit it the next day. We were taken up the river about 15 min and then hiked about 45 - 60 min thru the jungle to the tower. Much of the trail was very, very muddy and fortunately we were all in pretty good shape so it was fine. The tower was beautiful and in excellent shape, so it was well worth the hike and we got to see a number of birds tho it was a tad late in the morning for really good birding. Spent a good hour up there and our Kitchwa guide, Rene, worked hard to locate a number of birds both near and far.
After hiking back to the river we had to wait almost an hour by the riverbank for the boat to return even though we were waiting for him at the designated time.

Later that same day we enjoyed the highlight of our trip to the Amazon. Around 4:30 pm we went downriver and then to the beginning of a small tributary which supposedly led to the Napo Wildlife Centre to a place that was a Kichwa community docking spot. We transferred to a small wooden canoe and headed upstream for the next 2 hours. Here are some of the sightings: up to 10 giant otters within feet of the canoe, vocalizing, diving, stretching their necks to get a good look at us, one was crunching away at a large silver fish - just fantastic; a 2 toed sloth up in a tree and our Kichwa guide kept making a harpy eagle cry which made the sloth keep looking left and right and then down at us - fabulous to watch; howler monkeys jumping above us thru the trees - one which kept swinging and swinging before finally making a big leap across the river and then falling somewhere into the trees; saw a crane hawk, many-banded aracari, lineated woodpecker, blue throated piping guan, lizards; but by far the highlight was being surrounded by the amazing otters. The paddle back was beautiful - dusk was falling, the lush vegetation was stunningly beautiful - so mysterious and so close to us, so quiet not one of us dared speak but in whispers, the silence only sporatically broken by the odd cry of a distant bird. All in all it was a stunning 2 hours in the jungle.

Our last morning we were told we would be awakened at 4:30 am so a Kichwa woman could conduct a small ceremony, give us a native drink, we would tell her our dreams and she would interpret them. Sounded interesting but rather early rising for what was going to be a long day. Anyhow, we staggered out of our rooms and along the narrow planks to a thatched hut in a small clearing in the forest. There was a woman by an open fire, the manager and the Kichwa and Spanish guides. The woman recited some incantations over a steaming jug of water and herbs and then the 3 of us who were perched on several tree stumps were asked to drink a bowl of the liquid and then tell our dreams. I gave a very brief rendition of a recent dream, the translator translated, the Kichwa woman said about 5 words in response and then the manager proceeded to speak in Spanish for a full 5 or 10 minutes. Interpretation: you will travel far and have many interesting experiences. Well same thing with my husband and daughter. It was absolutely comical. The "dream woman" barely had a word to say in interpreting the dreams but the manager talked at great length after hearing each of our dreams. The manager again seemed to hold a lot of influence over everyone in the village, particularly the woman who really looked very submissive around him. (we rarely saw women around the village and none were near the dining room ever - most looked rather unhappy) After about an hour of this we were told we could go back to bed! It was very funny, though in some ways rather sad. Nobody seemed to be able to explain any of the rituals of the ceremony other than to say it was Kichwa ritual or Kichwa culture -this was how almost everything was explained during our 4 days.

The good news was the food was surprisingly good prepared by a young chef who had been trained at the Napo Wildlife Centre and every dish was tasty, artfully presented and served with great anticipation of our reaction. We lavished him with praise and we ended up eating far more than we normally do just to make sure they understood our appreciation for all their hard work. Our daughter is a vegetarian and I rarely eat meat, but 2 out of 3 meals a day were meat dishes. My heavens, I didn't want to see another chicken for a long time! At least 5 times a day we were greeted at the restaurant with a fresh fruit drink in a tall glass. After 2 days and 10 glasses of juice, I begged the chef to just make a couple a day for me, so he reduced the number to 4 a day. We all felt compelled to drink them as we knew how this was a measure of their hospitality, but boy it was filling. They just couldn't stop feeding us.

The young Kichwa guide named Rene was unfailingly polite and attentive, always anxious to make sure we were enjoying ourselves. Given that we were less than happy about the gap betw what we had been promised and what we found at the lodge, it meant we had to work hard to show how much we appreciated everything he did for us. He wasn't responsible for overselling the place to our tour company and it was obvious that he was unused to the kind of questions I was asking about his village and the culture. All in my fractured Spanish. I didn't like the manager. Though he smiled at us, his eyes were cold and you could feel the tension in the air betw him and others in the village. We didn't meet any of the high school kids in the village though saw the boys play a spirited game of soccer in torrential rain. It was fun to see but they all left the village the next day because of school holidays. They seemed very shy and had almost no eye contact with us during our stay. Odd, I thought. The almost complete absence of women was strange in that this was supposed to be a village. Never could quite figured it out.

The boat ride back to Coca was a very long and boring 2 hours. It's an open boat, was a tad chilly and very noisy. We had to tip so many people when we left it just makes you feel like a ruddy bank machine and makes parting company rather awkward. We had 3 hours to while away at the very uninteresting and basic Coca airport. Fortunately we were given a packed lunch as there didn't seem to be anyplace to eat at or near the airport. I gave away my juice box, chocolate bar and cookies to one of the women who were squatting outside the entrance selling gum and such. When I went back out a little while later, I noticed the items I'd given her were for sale on her tray. I was left with a feeling for the poverty and desperation of the place and the huge evidence of big exploration and development of the oil companies along
the Napo River. The only middle class people seemed to be the almost all young male, mostly non indigenous oil workers who filled our flight to and from Quito.

In all, we're glad we went to the Amazon to see the lovely wildlife, see the huge commercial development in the jungle, to laugh about some of the crazy things that happened at the lodge - yes we did laugh as it was so absurd at times, to see that this region is so radically different from the rest of Quito. But, if I were to do it again, i would want a reputable lodge with an in house naturalist who could explain the vegetation, customs, culture and wildlife - in English!

  • Stayed: March 2013, travelled with family
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3  Thank Sheila12335
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
NapoWildlifeCenter, Director de Relaciones con Clientes at Napo Cultural Center, responded to this reviewResponded 28 May 2013

Dear Sheila, we thank you for giving us a very detailed feed back of your stay in the Yasuni Kichwa Ecolodge, we regret that your stay had complications due in large part to the limited information provided by the tour operator even though we requested to the agency repeatedly to send us the Form Guest which includes many details (Boots, Food Preference, most preferred activities, among others), that help us to know the taste of our visitors in order to provide a more customized attention.

We firmly believe that this is an isolated incident, as the hotel has hosted world-class customers from different countries like Japan, France, Canada, the United States, among others, and several Government officials including Vice-President of the Republic, Foreign Ministers, Cabinet Ministers, leaders of the Yasuni ITT, plus the heads of several multinational companies, which have been very pleased with the service received at the Ecolodge, and congratulated the hotel management.

For business strategy we did not open comments for the Yasuni Kichwa Ecolodge in tripadvisor, but as we saw the rating you gave us, we want to thank you for encourage travelers to leave their opinion, and this will reflect the quality of service we provide.

We are sorry to hear that your trip was not exactly as you hoped it would be and I would like to take the opportunity to raise a few of the points made.

Guides: The person who does the transfers is not a guide, and his function is only to receive guests at the airport and direct the passengers to the motorized canoes so they can be transferred to the hotel.

Showers: Due to the high temperatures of the jungle until April WE had not implemented a system of hot water to the cabins, but since May of 2013 and thanks to the suggestion of several guests we are deploying solar panels for this purpose.
As for the cleanliness of the cabins, they are done daily as a hotel policy.

Shoes in the dining room: For hygiene of the hotel, our guests need to take off their shoes (they get dirty after the walks) in the dining area as this is where we serve food to our guests.

Electricity: The Yasuni Kichwa Ecolodge has an electrical system that provides electricity through solar panels that was recently implemented to reduce the environmental impact and offer more comfort to our guests to have electricity 24 hours . These outages have scheduled times and are informed in advance to all our visitors by the travel agency to avoid misunderstandings.

Observation Tower: Observation Tower of Yasuni Kichwa Ecolodge was built in March of 2013 and was designed at the beginning as an extreme adventure activity where is required the use of a climbing harness, now was redesigned and built a platform for safety.

Handicrafts: Kuri interpretation center Muyu is managed 100% by women from the Anangu Kichwa Community which is maintained by the income from the sale of handicrafts, which are handmade by various members of the community. The prices of these items contribute to community development.

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Additional Information about Napo Cultural Center

Address: Yasuni National Park, Ecuador (Formerly Yasuni Kichwa Ecolodge)
Phone Number:
Region: Ecuador > Orellana Province
Amenities:
Bar / Lounge Free Breakfast Children Activities (Kid / Family Friendly) Restaurant Suites Wheelchair access
Hotel Style:
Ranked #2 of 16 Speciality Lodging in Orellana Province
Number of rooms: 16
Official Description (provided by the hotel):
Napo Cultural Center offers an unforgettable experience in a first class eco-lodge with direct contact with Añangu Kichwa Community, featuring 16 comfortable and spacious cabins with modern facilities. Flavor traditional cuisine and share ancestral rites like the “guayusada” ceremony and Kichwa Catamaran which emulates old forms of trade in the amazon. One of the most striking and colorful experiences when you visit the Amazon jungle in Ecuador. Near the Napo River, you can find one of the biggest parrot clay licks of Yasuni National Park, a natural formation caused by erosion where parrots, parakeets and macaws go daily to feed with the minerals that are concentrated in the soil. The spectacle is just impressive not only for the color diversity but for the incredible acoustic show of different sounds birds do when licking the clay ... more   less 

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