We noticed that you're using an unsupported browser. The TripAdvisor website may not display properly.We support the following browsers:
Windows: Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome. Mac: Safari.

“Deeply impressed by the magnitude of those who died.”

Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague
Book In Advance
More Info
US$134.16*
and up
Private Prague Full-Day Tour: Jewish Quarter and City Sights
Ranked #49 of 950 things to do in Prague
Certificate of Excellence
More attraction details
Attraction details
Owner description: Permanent exhibition Children's Drawings from the Terezin Ghetto Located on the first floor, this exhibition focuses on the fate of Jewish children who were incarcerated in the Terezin ghetto during the Second World War. It is based on the now world famous children's drawings that were made in the ghetto between 1942 and 1944 under the supervision of the artist Friedl Dicker-Brandeis. These emotionally powerful drawings bear testimony to the persecution of Jews during the Nazi occupation of the Bohemian lands in 1939-45. They document the transports to Terezin and daily life in the ghetto, as well as the dreams of returning home and of life in the Jewish homeland of Palestine. The vast majority of the children perished in the gas chambers of Auschwitz-Birkenau. The Pinkas Synagogue is part of the Jewish Museum in Prague. The Pinkas Synagogue is the second oldest preserved synagogue in Prague. Bbuilt in the late Gothic style in 1535, it was founded by Aaron Meshulam Horowitz, a prominent member of the Prague Jewish Community, and probably named after his grandson, Rabbi Pinkas Horowitz. It was originally a place of prayer for the Horowitz family and was located near a ritual bath (mikveh). It was restored to its original form in 1950-54. Memorial to the Bohemian and Moravian Victims of the Shoah In 1955-60 the Pinkas Synagogue was turned into a memorial to the nearly 80,000 Jewish victims of the Shoah from Bohemia and Moravia. One of the earliest memorials of its kind in Europe, it is the work of two painters, Václav Boštík and Jiří John. After the Soviet invasion of 1968, the memorial was closed to the public for more than 20 years. It was fully reconstructed and reopened to the public in 1995 after the fall of the Communist regime.
Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Level Contributor
15 reviews
8 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 2 helpful votes
“Deeply impressed by the magnitude of those who died.”
Reviewed 30 April 2014

This is a memorial to the prague Jews who died during the holocaust. Such a simple momument but the amount of names of the victims left me speachless.

Visited April 2014
Helpful?
1 Thank Catherine v
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
jewishmuseminprague, Tým podpory webu TripAdvisorFront Office Manager at Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague, responded to this review, 5 September 2015
Thank you very much, we are very happy the Jewish Museum in Prague was so impactful and we will look forward your next visit!
Report response as inappropriate
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Write a Review

564 reviews from our community

Visitor rating
    325
    156
    61
    9
    13
Date | Rating
  • Chinese (Simplified) first
  • Czech first
  • Danish first
  • Dutch first
  • English first
  • French first
  • German first
  • Hebrew first
  • Italian first
  • Japanese first
  • Korean first
  • Norwegian first
  • Polish first
  • Portuguese first
  • Russian first
  • Spanish first
  • Swedish first
  • Thai first
  • Turkish first
  • Any
English first
Bucharest, Romania
Level Contributor
343 reviews
172 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 331 helpful votes
“a synagogue and a memorial”
Reviewed 24 April 2014

a very old synagogue, built around 1500 was turned into a memorial to the jews that died during the WW2. on the walls you can find the names of all the jews that were killed by the nazis, a really history lesson, aroun 80.000. this happened only after the 90s when the restoration of the building was finished.

the visit to this places in included in all the tours and can be found right next to the entrance to the jewish cemetery.

Visited April 2014
Helpful?
2 Thank deired
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
jewishmuseminprague, Tým podpory webu TripAdvisorFront Office Manager at Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague, responded to this review, 18 July 2015
Thank you very much, we are happy you enjoyed your visit and we´ll be pleased to welcome you again in the Jewish Museum in Prague!
Report response as inappropriate
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Karlsruhe, Germany
Level Contributor
35 reviews
16 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 18 helpful votes
“don´t forget is closed on saturdays!”
Reviewed 8 March 2014

in the first floor you will find the names of all the holocaust victims that lived in Prag and in the second floor hundreds of drawings from jews kids, it is sad but also helps us refresh our memory of what happened. The cemetery is something you can´t miss. Behind the cemetery building there is a small door where you can see a preview of it.

Visited March 2014
Helpful?
1 Thank Andrea E
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
jewishmuseminprague, Tým podpory webu TripAdvisorFront Office Manager at Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague, responded to this review, 19 July 2015
Thank you very much, we are happy you enjoyed your visit and we´ll be pleased to welcome you again in the Jewish Museum in Prague!
Report response as inappropriate
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Lincoln, United Kingdom
Level Contributor
47 reviews
14 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 22 helpful votes
“Humbling experience”
Reviewed 28 February 2014

After going around most of the other Jewish synagogues, in reverse order from the map, we had only this and the Jewish cemetery left to see. All the other synagogues were nice to go around and see all the objects that are used in burials and ceremony's etc but they were very much non descript and it felt kind of repetitive (there are only so many Torah pointers that you can look at).This synagogue on the other hand was completely different.

Maybe I should of read a little bit about this place before walking into it, as it really did effect me, it is so shocking. Every wall is filled with names, names of the Jews that were killed by the Nazis, listed by town, surname, dob, dod and last known address. The details which are given seem to make it more real, these people lived, they had homes and families of their own.

There isn't any fancy drawings or artistic writing, it is all just very plainly written in red and black on the stark white walls. You really can't comprehend what 80,000 names looks like until you see this place, it really hits home how many people lost their lives.

Upstairs there is an art exhibit. Art drawn by the children who were imprisoned in Terezin. What more can you say on this, it is so overpowering, some even show pictures of the children and all list there dod bar a few that survived.

The cemetery shows the grave stones of some 3,000 Jews and has been used for many years, the grave stones now mainly unreadable. You learn about how they bury people sometimes six on top of each other as Jewish cemeteries can never be closed down and also that there must be a source of water there. But what got me was going from seeing the 80,000 names to seeing 3,000 graves, makes you realise the scale of death, remember the 3,000 in the cemetery died over hundreds of years the 80,000 over only a few!

Recommend to all to go and see this, makes you realise how lucky you are.

Visited February 2014
Helpful?
2 Thank Nat C
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
jewishmuseminprague, Tým podpory webu TripAdvisorFront Office Manager at Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague, responded to this review, 5 September 2015
Thank you for your review. We´ll be pleased to welcome you again!
Report response as inappropriate
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Dartmouth, United Kingdom
Level Contributor
107 reviews
65 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 40 helpful votes
“A sad but moving place”
Reviewed 14 February 2014

We visited this synagogue as part of a three hour tour of the Jewish Museum.The main part was moving as it listed the 80,000 names of all the Jews of Bohemia and Moravia that were exterminated by the Nazis in the Second World War.The other part was very interesting and sad as it showed details including photographs of Jewish children and the artwork they were encouraged to do at the Terezin concentration camp from where nearly 80,000 were deported to their deaths at Auschwitz.

Visited February 2014
Helpful?
Thank Paul W
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
jewishmuseminprague, Tým podpory webu TripAdvisorFront Office Manager at Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague, responded to this review, 18 July 2015
Thank you very much, we are happy you enjoyed your visit and we´ll be pleased to welcome you again in the Jewish Museum in Prague!
Report response as inappropriate
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of TripAdvisor LLC

Travellers who viewed Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague also viewed

 

Been to Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague? Share your experiences!

Write a Review Add Photos & Videos

Owners: What's your side of the story?

Own or manage this property? Claim your listing for free to respond to reviews, update your profile and much more.

Claim Your Listing