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Plan Your Rhodes Holiday: Best of Rhodes

About Rhodes
Rhodes is the star of Greece’s Dodecanese islands thanks to its large size and incredible history. Packed with ancient and medieval sites, gorgeous beaches, and plenty of bars and restaurants, it’s easy to see why it’s so popular. The UNESCO-listed medieval city is incredibly well-preserved, complete with a castle, 2.5 miles of stone walls, and a maze of streets and their modern additions: shops, restaurants, and bars. The interior of the 50-mile island is hilly and rural, while the coast is dotted with resorts, high-rise hotels, and small villages, like photogenic Lindos with its ancient hilltop acropolis, modern village of whitewashed houses, and incredible beaches.

Essential Rhodes

How to do Rhodes in 3 days

Lush valleys, cobbled shopping streets, and a floating restaurant
Read on

Where to get medieval in Rhodes

Exploring the old city of Rhodes feels like travelling back to medieval times when the streets were ruled by crusaders known as the Knights of Saint John. In an effort to revive the island’s glory days, many of its stone buildings have been completely reconstructed—and I recommend checking them out even if ancient ruins aren’t your thing. Here’s my guide to getting into a medieval mood.
Helen Iatrou, Athens, Greece
  • Thalassini Pyli
    162
    Following the coastal road, you’ll walk through a narrow arched entrance between these tall, imposing twin towers and emerge in the well-preserved Old Town. Thalassini Pyli is one of 11 gates into Rhodes, and definitely the most impressive. Don’t miss the carvings of the Virgin Mary, John the Baptist, and Saint Peter.
  • Fortifications of Rhodes
    138
    Built by the Knights of Saint John, these medieval defenses remain upright centuries later. Take a walk along the top of the city walls—wide enough that you won’t worry about children getting too close to the edge—to gain a sense of the size of the medieval town below and to peer out over the Aegean Sea. Make sure to bring water and wear comfortable shoes.
  • Mandraki Harbour
    1,392
    Stroll to the far end of a causeway, pausing to admire three well-preserved windmills, to reach the 15th-century Fortress of Agios Nikolaos, built to protect Mandraki Harbour from invaders. At the entrance to the harbour, a Venetian-era bronze stag and doe stand atop stone columns, greeting seafarers. Today that mostly means the owners of the yachts that are anchored nearby.
  • Palace of the Grand Master of the Knights of Rhodes
    6,613
    Built around a grand courtyard, the 14th-century Palace of the Grand Master is one of the best preserved medieval monuments in Rhodes. Destroyed by an explosion in 1856, it was later restored to serve as Italian Dictator Benito Mussolini’s summer home. It actually got something of an upgrade, with architects installing intricate mosaic floors taken from Greece. The palace houses two museums, one devoted to medieval Rhodes.
  • Street of the Knights
    1,141
    It’s easy to envision knights on horseback thundering across these cobblestones. A local guide helped me imagine what this street looked like back in the day, pointing out the seven inns that housed knights according to their birthplace. Ornate coats of arms, intricate carvings, and—in the case of the French—a sculpture of the Virgin Mary and child are still visible today.
  • Archaeological Museum of Rhodes (Hospital of the Knights)
    2,533
    Erected in 1489, this stately two-story building originally served as the Hospital of the Knights. Today, it hosts an awesome archaeological museum filled with artifacts like vases, figurines, and jewellery from hundreds of years before the Knights took control. Beneath one of the porticoes surrounding the building’s courtyard is its mascot, an enigmatic stone lion.

Browse collections

Heaven for history buffs

Ancient sights you don’t want to miss

Day-to-night beach fun

Outstanding beaches and beach clubs

Calling all seafood lovers

All the must-eats from the ocean

Medieval must-sees

Explore an iconic medieval city

Out on the Mediterranean Sea

Boat tours, day cruises, and epic views