• Renowned throughout the world for its rich literary tradition and unique musical heritage from traditional to rock, Dublin is the 'City of Living Culture' .
  • Dublin's culture is defined by the Irish sense of 'Craic', often referenced but never understood until experienced.  Being the capital city, Dublin's Craic is more cosmopolitan than, say, Galway's.  But it's no less enjoyable for being different. 
  • To have the Craic in Dublin you really have to make your way towards Grafton Street and its surrounding streets.  Dubliners will rarely now be caught in Temple Bar.  Then just pick your favourite pub, grab a pint of what you fancy (Dubliners drink far less Guinness than people think) and soak up the atmosphere.     
  • What else are you supposed to do?  Whatever you like, chat to people, tell them your life story, find your true love, forget it all the next day and start all over again.
  • Dublin is a rather cultural spot.  It boasts a lively theatre and music scene, historic houses and gardens, a rich literary history, wonderful galleries and museums.
  • National Library of Ireland, Kildare Street, Dublin 2. The National Library of Ireland has an outstanding free exhibition on Ireland's greatest poet, William Butler Yeats. Films, sound recording recordings, original manuscripts, books, photos and interactive displays tell the story of his life and work. 
  • The Dublin Writers Museum, 18 Parnell Square, Dublin 1The Dublin Writers Museum, a splendidly restored Georgian house in the north city centre, houses a collection that features the lives and works of Dublin's literary celebrities over the past three hundred years. Swift and Sheridan, Shaw and Wilde, Yeats, Joyce and Beckett are among those presented through their books, letters, portraits and personal items. 
  • Temple Bar Traditional Irish Music & Culture Festival 25 Jan 2007 - 28 Jan 2007. Based in Dublin’s Temple Bar. The Festival is a celebration of Irish traditional culture. The main focus of the festival is traditional music, but other aspects of Irish culture are celebrated such as story telling, dance, literature, film and the Irish language.                        
  • One of most popular cultural events is St. Patrick’s Festival 15 to 19 March for music, fireworks and ‘Craic’, on 17 March, St Patrick’s Day, the entire city centre comes to a standstill for the ‘Parade’                  
  • Bloomsday, 16 June, An annual celebration of James Joyce’s Ulysses. It is the anniversary of the day in 1904, when his fictional character, Leopold Bloom, undertook an odyssey through the city. The events of day are re-enacted by anyone who cares to participate, Blooms itinerary is followed all across Dublin. At lunchtime it's traditional to stop off for a glass of Burgundy and a Gorgonzola sandwich at Davy Byrne's Pub on Duke Street, (off Grafton St.) just as Bloom did. In the afternoon the Ormond Hotel (on the quays) is the spot for an afternoon pint, many people dress in the style of 1904.  
  • James Joyce Museum, Sandycove, Co. DublinThe Joyce Tower in Sandycove is famous as the setting for the opening of James Joyce's Ulysses. Dramatically located on a cliff-top overlooking the sea, the tower stands eight miles south of Dublin city by the coast road. Objects in the museum bring Joyce and his works vividly to life. More than just a museum or historic building, the Joyce Tower is a living monument to the most exciting moment in literary history.
  • Shaw Birthplace, 33 Synge Street, Dublin 8. The first home of the Shaw family and the renowned playwright George Bernard Shaw has been restored to its Victorian elegance and charm. The neat terraced house is as much a celebration of domestic life in  Victorian Dublin as of the early years of one of Dublin's nobel prize-winners for literature: full of the nostalgia and atmosphere of another era.                  
  • Dublin Theatre   Dubliners and visitors  can enjoy excellent productions at the  Abbey and Peacock, theatres , the Gate, the Olympia, the  Gaiety, the  Project Arts Centre and Andrew's Lane Theatre, which are all in the city centre or the  Helix in D.C.U.  Drumcondra and the Civic Theatre in Tallaght.  Tickets by international standards aren’t expensive.

Please browse the  Dublin's Cultural Guide