This is an emotive subject as some people will say upset tummy is due to food-related problems, others will say it's dehydration & over indulgence of alcohol / food, while another group will say it's down to not being used to the climate. Some will also say that too cool air conditioning will send the body into a kind of thermal shock. Whatever reason you choose to prefer, it seems that a certain amount of luck also enters into the equation.

The following information is not intended to replace medical advice from a qualified Dr / health care practitioner who knows an individual’s family history. They are suggestions only but some of the general tips have come from qualified nutritionists, pharmacists & Drs as well as the experiences of fellow posters. Hotels have Drs on call 24/7 & they are very used to dealing with tourists & upset tummies! Having said that, there are many travellers who have never had a problem in countless visits to Egypt.

*There are some basic tips which may help prevent it & they will also apply to anyone who is suffering from it as, whatever the cause, one still needs to rehydrate, “flush the system” & also have relief from some of the symptoms:

*Swimming pools are often implicated in the manifestation of gastric ailments; particularly Cryptosporidium contamination;

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/art...  

*Take wipes or antibacterial handwash & carry them with you as the money is truly filthy & so many people want to shake your hand. Some bugs are picked up from things / food when others haven’t washed their hands.

* There are many chemists in Sharm who seem very knowledgeable & helpful. UK products are often ineffective! (“Local drugs for local bugs” principle) If you feel that you have a problem that is not just a bit of traveller’s diarrhoea, whilst you adjust to the climate, ask for Antinal (antibiotic) at about £1 a packet. It’s about 5LE to an Egyptian. If you get it for 10LE you’re doing well. If they try & charge more, then walk away & go elsewhere. Some people are caught out as they are in “dire straits” when they get to the pharmacy & end up paying over the odds. Consider buying products as a “safety net” or when you’re able to spend time haggling / walking on to the next one.

*Antinal suspension is available for kids. (Web info says it’s also known as Ambatrol (nifuroxazide)Bacifurane, Nifrozid, Endiex.& Ercefuryl, but it’s Antinal in Egypt ).

*Antinal’s not licensed in the UK but can be prescribed on a named patient basis. It’s considered an old-fashioned drug over here now & is used for animals since newer drugs have superseded it .

* You may be offered "Enteroquinol" which is banned in most countries as it’s thought to cause subacute myelo-optic neuropathy (a nervous disease (neuropathy) that affects peripheral nerves & the spinal cord (myelo-) as well as the eyes (-optic), leading to a disabling paralysis, blindness).

*The newer drug used in the UK as a prophylactic & treatment is Ciprofloxacin, available from some GPs on private prescription. It can also be bought directly over the counter in Egypt.

*You may hear some people mentioning Dukoral.  This is an oral vaccine against cholera and really is not necessary for a holiday to Egypt but some gps will allow people to take it as it can help prevent upset stomachs / travellers' diarrohea.  This is down to tourists individual preference & subject to the views of individual gps.

*N.B. You need to haggle re: the price of anything bought in chemists. All goods have the price on, but (in my experience) in Arabic, so it’s hard to tell what it should be. If whatever you’re trying to buy seems expensive, barter hard or walk away; there are enough chemists around to find one who will play fair.

*Local peppermint tea also helps with the digestion.

*One tip from a UK chemist was to take Motilium pills along, as they aid digestion & prevent anything lying heavily in the gut. It’s not a laxative but if you have something dodgy, it helps it to go thru (without making you rush to the loo.)

*Maybe take rehydration sachets with you like Dioralyte, available in fruity flavours from Tesco, Boots etc.

* Citricidal (Grape fruit seed extract – pills or drops) It’s available in Health Shops & there are several websites explaining that conventional antibiotics only kill bacteria. The grapefruit seed extract has been shown to inactivate viruses, yeasts, fungi, parasites and worms, as well as bacteria. It is therefore antibacterial, antifungal and antimicrobial. Recommended 1-3 tablets a day, with or without meals & it’s ideal for travelling to places where food or drink may be contaminated. You can get the drops to put in water / soft drinks.

*N.B. Drink plenty of water when taking Citricidal as it can irritate some people’s stomachs.

*Lactobacillus acidophilus pre-biotic tablets may also help line your stomach in preparation for unfamiliar bacteria potentially found in the food out   there. They optimise the gut flora balance. You can buy ones that don’t have to be kept in the fridge & ones for children. When taking acidophilus do not drink or eat anything really hot immediately after as heat kills the good bacteria. These are far stronger than the commercialized drinks like yakult & actimel, which are dairy-based, full of refined sugar & not ideal for upset tums!

*Lactobacillus is also good to take after any course of antibiotics since antibiotics strip the gut of good bacteria, as well as the bad. It rebalances the gut flora.

* Bimuno is another option as a prebiotic, to help prepare the gut & ensure optimum flora balance. Discussed here:

http://www.tripadvisor.co.uk/ShowTopi...

*You can buy Buscopan, over the counter here, which is great for stomach gripes & is used for horses with colic!

*Freshly squeezed lemon & lime juice, sugar to taste, topped up with still mineral water is a good kidney / system flush. If that’s not available, then just freshly squeezed lemon is still good.

* Avoid fresh orange as that’s hard for the liver to process.

*Aloe Vera is also a good & natural soother, for the inside as well as being a good topical aid for sunburn.

*Magi Cool will help children (google it). It’s good for itching (incl. insect bites), prickly heat, sunburn / minor burns, heat exhaustion, hot flushes, first aid. You can get magi cool in most chemists, Boots etc; & you can now get one that instantly removes the heat out of too much sunburn.

*There are also cooling patches, with a soothing gel, that relieve headaches & fevers, which may be useful for children.

* Consider carefully about hiring snorkelling equipment as nobody can guarantee how well it has been cleaned.

*Drink plenty of water, at least 1 litre per 50lbs / 22.70kgs of body weight.